Skip to Main Content View Text-Only

The City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Phone: 503-823-5185

Fax: 503-823-7576

1120 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204

More Contact Info


2018 A Sunday Parkways Year in Review

Sunday Parkways on the Green LoopA big Thank You to our participants, volunteers, partners, entertainers, vendors, and Sponsors! Thanks to you, Sunday Parkways continues to introduce Portlanders of all ages to biking, walking and public transit as options for not only commuting but recreation by opening miles of streets for play, exercise, and community building. These routes were designed to create a fun and inclusive environment for people to enjoy neighborhood greenways and low traffic residential streets. Along the way, we also have an opportunity to mingle as a City, to have fun with friends and family, and to come together as a community. 

This year we partied like it was 1999! We walked, we rolled, and we biked 37.8 miles. And the cherry on top, we achieved multiple firsts:

-          First time at Sunday Parkways on the Green Loop 

-          First time for many participants, volunteers, vendors and Sponsors to join the fun!      

-          First time at Gateway Discovery Park 

-          First time the Bi-lingual Bike Fair has appeared at all of our events

-          First time that Kaiser Permanente  has offered custom neighborhood inspired decals for the Sticker Hunt 

DJ Prashant dancing with the Trail Blazer Dancers at the Rose Quarters

  • And we had some great times for the second time around!

-          Second round of celebrating our Immigrant and Refugee roots, friends and families with the Walk for Refugees and Immigrants 

-          Second round on the ONE* Route in East Portland

  • ONE = Outer Northeast/ East

-          Second round return of having the Columbia Annex back on the route

-          Second time we have teamed up with Make Music Day 

So you may be wondering, how did we do overall?

-          We biked/rolled/walked 37.8 miles together. Bringing the total mileage, we have traveled for Sunday Parkways up to 367.6 miles!

-          We volunteered…a LOT! Around 700+ volunteers came out to Sunday Parkways to serve over 100+ shifts working a total of 4500 hours to keep Sunday Parkways rolling.

           We  owe a BIG ROUND OF APPLAUSE  to ALL the volunteers. We appreciate all you do to make these days so magical.

-          We have a large entourage. 125,000 people came out to Sunday Parkways this year!!!

Its been one brilliant wonderful ride with all of YOU! Thank you for joining us. You are a reminder that community, family and friends make the world a better place. See you in 2019 for another round of happiness, smiles, health and community.

Portland is ________! Fill in the blank exercise.

 A picture of Kʰunamokwst park

Sunday Parkways launched  (1)________ amazing years ago, and next year we will celebrate our (2) ________ ride in North Portland.  Here is a look at Sunday Parkways and Portland by the numbers:

You might not know this, but Portland loves to bike and roll! In fact, about (3) ________ % of our commuters bike in comparison to the national average of 0.5% across the country. In addition, we love walking! (4) _________of kids (K-8th grade) walk to school.

We are also serious about flowers here. Which may be why we are known as the (5) _____ City. In fact, (6) ________ Park, on the North Sunday Parkway route includes the city’s first public rose garden, community center and Portland’s second oldest playground. This park completed in 1913 was purchased in 1909 for $60,000 and was originally owned by businesswoman Liverpool Liz who used it as a site for a roadhouse and racetrack.

In Portland, we are also known for our love of a good drink, whether that is a good cup of homegrown kombucha or a beer. This year, Sunday Parkways collaborated with local brewery (7) ________ to create the Portland Parkways Premium Pilsner. 

On last lagniappe question! Do you know the meaning of the Chinook word Kʰunamokwst?

As we ease into Autumn and Winter, we enter the (8) _______ season that makes our dear city so famously green. Let's keep our hearts warm with thoughts of spring just around the corner. Until then, we would like to leave you with just a touch of magic

See you in 2019 Portland!

 

 

Key: (1) 11 (2) 50 (3) 7% (4) 42% (5) Rose (6) Peninsula (7) Lompoc (8) rainy (Lagniappe) together 

A Conversation about Keeping Oregon Well - Part 2 of a 3 Part Series

Logan Lynn, Chief Impact Officer, talks about a changing approach to mental health care – making it cool! Trillium Family Services, through the Keep Oregon Well campaign, is partnering with artists from across the country and world to talk about the importance of acknowledging and treating mental health. In this special edition interview, Logan opens up about his own journey with mental health care, why this work is so important, and how we all can show up for Mental Health at Sunday Parkways and beyond!

Logan Lynn says,"1in 4 Oregonians will experience a mental health crisis in their lifetime*. The national average is 1 in 5. The myth is that people think it’s a character flaw, not a natural part of life. At any given time 139K people are getting mental health care services. For example, if you broke your arm you would got to the doctor and get it fixed. There is no shame involved in breaking your arm. [On the other hand,] if you are having a mental struggle there is not a lot of casseroles brought to your house, there’s not a lot of calling around, [instead] there is a lot of shame. We [at Keep Oregon Well] celebrate neural diversity, my brain being different is part of my magic."

Can you tell me more about Trillium? Your services and the people you serve?

I am a person who has a history of drug addiction, child abuse and depression. I worked in music and was approached to mix my music with Keep Oregon Well.

Why is it important to connect the mental health conversation to music?

Keep Oregon Well was the intervention I needed when I was a kid.  Music was a connector for me and it has the possibility to save lives...

We (Trillium Family Services) reach about 2.5 million people every week [through our radio station work and outreach programs]. We do outreach events. We partner with Charlie XCX and team up with [other] artists. We made mental healthcare cool. We had about 18 girls lining up for Charlie XCX, who was talking about our show, and we we’re like: “We did it! We made mental health cool!”

Who does this impact? Why is this work important?

It’s sort of like you’re on an airplane and they tell you to put on your own mask first, we are doing that for the community; if you don’t take care of yourself, you’re not good for your community, your job, your relationships. So everything you care about can flourish, [if you practice self-care].

What are some of the myths around mental illness?

Think of mental health like physical health. Some days my back feels great, some days it doesn’t and I go to my chiropractor. Replace chiropractor with therapist. Mental health looks different for everybody, but there is no day we go without our brains. We’ve been told that we should be ashamed about one part of our body and that’s why for 20 years I’ve been talking about mental health. Since I think its preposterous that I should feel ashamed about one part of my body…my brain.

1 in 4 Oregonians will experience a mental health crisis in their lifetime*. The national average is 1 in 5. The myth is that people think it’s a character flaw, not a natural part of life. At any given time 139K people are getting mental health care services. For example, if you broke your arm you would got to the doctor and get it fixed. There is no shame involved in breaking your arm. [On the other hand,] if you are having a mental struggle there is not a lot of casseroles brought to your house, there’s not a lot of calling around, [instead] there is a lot of shame. We [at Keep Oregon Well] celebrate neural diversity, my brain being different is part of my magic.

So, how do we know it’s time to get mentally healthy? And what can we do for ourselves or others when we see someone’s mental health waning?

We have tons of resources posted on KeepOregonWell.com. The best place to start is yourself. Acknowledge your struggles, get a therapist, and make a recovery plan. I know it’s possible. I’ve lived that.

How did y ’all come up with the motto “Keep Oregon Well”?

My first day here, I was talking with Trillium CEO Kim Scott and brainstorming on how we should be able to build a whole social movement around Keeping Oregon Well -  and it sprung from there!

Logan Lynn says,"1in 4 Oregonians will experience a mental health crisis in their lifetime*. The national average is 1 in 5. The myth is that people think it’s a character flaw, not a natural part of life. At any given time 139K people are getting mental health care services. For example, if you broke your arm you would got to the doctor and get it fixed. There is no shame involved in breaking your arm. [On the other hand,] if you are having a mental struggle there is not a lot of casseroles brought to your house, there’s not a lot of calling around, [instead] there is a lot of shame. We [at Keep Oregon Well] celebrate neural diversity, my brain being different is part of my magic."

I know that you have worked with KP to further broadcast this messaging about keeping Oregon well. How did you begin this partnership with Kaiser Permanente?

Trillium is Oregon’s largest mental health provider for children and families. Kaiser Permanente is a huge supporter of Trillium through its programs. KP is a long-term partner of Trillium. Another main supporter is KINK. We’ve worked together to saturate the market and we decided to create wellness hubs at Sunday Parkways together. Kaiser Permanente has their find their words campaign about (1) story telling (2) identifying people with lived experiences [and helping them] share their stories (3) and finding common ground to work together. We are also a partner with Kaiser Permanente’s Sticker hunt**.

What kind of activity will you be providing at Sunday Parkways?

Partners with Keep Oregon Well work to fight stigma. We pass out advocacy swag and we will be handed out swag for all participants at Sunday Parkways who make the pledge. KINK is there because of the music is a big part of Keep Oregon Well’s making community.

* Logan Lynn: Social determinants of health include addressing: racism, poverty, gentrification, homophobia and hunger. Left unattended these experiences will turn to trauma.

** Trillium is one of three mental health organizations that will receive $3,000 from Kaiser Permanente as a partner in its social cause campaign to talk about Mental Health and Healthy living at Sunday Parkways. For every Sticker Hunt that was turned in, Kaiser Permanente will provide $5 to one of the mental health organizations, which equals roughly be $3,000 for Trillium Family Services. Thank you, Portland, for making that possible!!

Want more information on National Mental Health Data? Check out the Mental Health America website.  

Photos Courtesy of the Q Center and Trillium Family Services.  

A Conversation about Keeping Oregon Well - Part 1 of a 3 Part Series

Folk Time, Inc. was one of three mental health organizations who was chosen as a participant for the Kaiser Permanente's social cause campaign connected to the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt. For every Sticker Hunt that was turned in, Kaiser Permanente provided $5 to one of the mental health organizations, which roughly equals $3,000 per organization this year. Thank you, Portland, for making that possible!! 

Angel Prater, the Executive Director of Folk-Time, Inc.,  will join Sunday Parkways to talk about fighting social isolation and providing peer based mental health care.  Please enjoy this article that discusses the amazing work that her organization does in Portland and across the region. 

Angel Prater says, "Learn to respond with hope, rather than fear.  Allow people to express how they are feeling without judgement or criticism.  Sometimes people just want and need to feel heard and validated, even when we may not understand or agree. Try to connect to the “feelings” people express.  Don’t rely on diagnostic language, it only leaves room for interpretation."Can you tell me more about Folk Time? Your services and the people you serve?

Founded in 1985, Folk-Time, Inc. is a non-profit community service agency whose ongoing commitment is to provide a culture of inclusiveness. By providing and establishing connection through support, participation, wellness services, and dedication to the road of recovery, FolkTime provides support and advocacy for those with share lived experiences in the Portland Metro Area for over 30 years.  To see the full list of programs, scroll to the end of this page.

Who does your organization impact?

Oregonians: [are] ultimately the people we serve; offering a safe place for individuals to have hope filled support and purpose.  From an organizational/business perspective, we also impact the entire health system.  Ranging from offering alternative supports, reducing recidivism into higher levels of care and save our tax payers money to be utilized in other areas of our state. Building bridges to fill gaps in our state, bridges between Traditional Health Care and Non-traditional Health Care.

 Why is this work important?

The individuals who have accessed traditional mental health/addiction services have had a wide range of experiences, those we serve have expressed dissatisfaction and a lack of trust in our system design and care.  We at FolkTime aim to bring voice and choice to our health system customers, while also working alongside provider agencies/health systems and offer quality system change support, equity and inclusion education.  Being aligned with values to provide quality care, our partners/contractors love working with us to ensure Oregonians are getting quality of life opportunities though peer support.

What are some of the myths around mental health and mental illness? How should we think of mental health?

That people who have mental health experiences are violent or never get well, that they aren’t educated.  This is simply just not true.  Many people walk around with “mental health challenge” every day and you would never know. We have individuals who have been diagnosed on our staff and board who also have their masters and other advanced degrees.  We even have allies who have PHD’s and talk about their own mental health recovery. Stigma is real! The only way to reduce shame and guilt driven stigma is to “normalize” mental health and addiction to allow a safe place for individuals to talk about it without their rights stolen or people reacting out of fear. Mental health impacts everyone...

What are steps that everyday people can make to make it easier to talk about and address mental health?

Learn to respond with hope, rather than fear.  Allow people to express how they are feeling without judgement or criticism.  Sometimes people just want and need to feel heard and validated, even when we may not understand or agree. Try to connect to the “feelings” people express.  Don’t rely on diagnostic language, it only leaves room for interpretation. 

Ask people what it means for them when they say things like “I’m depressed” or I’m feeling suicidal” etc.  Don’t assume you know what they mean when using this language.  If you assume, then you’re likely missing something underneath that needs to be expressed.  Talk about what things feel like rather than “look like”. Intentional Peer Support by Shery Mead (FolkTime is the Oregon US HUB) trains everyday people (and all human service providers including clinicians) to learn to listen differently, exploring meaning, trauma and much more.

How do we know if it’s time to get mentally healthy? And what can we do for ourselves or others when we see our mental health waning?

Mental Health is an individual thing.  Despite what people have been taught, it truly is individualized.  Therefore, keeping well includes exploring your diet, exercise, vitamin levels and overall health supports mental wellness.  TOO many people rely on a “mental health provider” to “fix them” even our commercials today are promoting “Mental Illness” and diagnosing people with their advertisements.  What you can “do” when someone is having something happen and feelings of being helpless/hopeless or extreme experience, sit with them, talk listen explore what they want/need from you. 

What is social isolation? And what do you think people should know about social isolation?

Social isolation is common, many people become socially isolated for various reasons.  Some people feel fear about being around others when they have stigmatized, marginalized and called crazy etc.  Some others, do not have the means to have social lives, many people who have been diagnosed are poor, and therefore their only real “social” interactions consist of “paid supports”.  We have social programs to give individuals who have been diagnosed and isolated from other communities, they come together to learn together, do art, create groups, activities and much more.  Others who have experienced social isolation, turned their attention to becoming authors, advocates, activists etc.  I would encourage someone to read/learn about Consumer-Survivor- Ex Patient movement (CSX).

This sounds like a simple question, but it’s a complex modern issue - how can your average Joan and James address social isolation?

By reaching out to their community and helping to create cohesive community. Getting some education of what Recovery initiatives are exploring around the world.  Mental Health in the United States is very limited – [look] to what other countries do, look like and offer.  Alternatives to medication and hospitalization like Peer Respites, holistic therapy and more.

Do you have an organizational motto?

We are building something that will outlive us all!! Empowering individuals with shared lived experience.  We walk alongside each individual during their journey.

Any other information you would like to share: 

Thank you for all you do!!

Folk Time

For an in-depth look at their programs. See more below! 

Programs of FolkTime:

  1. a.       Unity Hospital Legacy Health: FolkTime staff are consumers of mental health services who have participated in specific trainings to learn how to support others in various stages of mental health recovery. Peers help in the following capacity:

i.      Psychiatric Emergency Services (PES) – Peers meet with individuals one-on-one to facilitate connection and empathy in a time of crisis.

ii.      Inpatient Units – Peers may accompany transfers from the PES, they may meet individual’s family members, they may create longer term relationships with individuals within the facility, and they may explore bridging individuals into the community.

iii.      Bridging in Community – Peers may accompany individuals to 12 Step meetings to explore and connect individuals with other peers in these communities. Peers may accompany individuals to appointments. Peers may also engage each other in the discovery of bicycle greenways and public transportation. And peers may just go to movies, meals, or cafes with individuals simply broadening the spectrum of worldview.

  1. Clackamas County Contracted Programs:

 i.      Clinic Based Programs:  Behavioral Health Funding

  1. Riverstone Crisis Clinic:  Crisis Support: FolkTime Peer Support Specialists at Riverstone are able to offer genuine empathy having personally travelled similar roads of distress, discomfort, and trauma.
  2. Mental Health Court: Peer Support attend weekly court meetings, assist participants with recovery plan for mental health and addictions, assure participants are actively following their court ordered program, assist with entitlements, work and housing, and assist participants in developing appropriate community-based leisure activities and natural supports.
  3. Stewart/Hilltop Clinic: Peers advocate for participants within the clinic and support them in the community to find natural supports for long term mental health. Peer Specialists meet one-on-one with individuals and provide peer support groups.
  4. Sandy Clinic: Peers advocate for participants within the clinic and support them in the community to find natural supports for long term mental health
  5. Child and Family Navigation and SupportFamily navigators/supports provide families who have children with diagnosis within the mental health/developmental service sectors, providing supports, training guidance and advocacy.

  ii.      Social Programs: Behavioral Health Funding

Our Social Programs offer a safe place for people to gather together to form a community. We offer a variety of social activities, art and craft projects, writing groups, support groups, bingo and community activities as well. FolkTime believes in authenticity and encourages everyone to be themselves in order to form real connections with others. Each site offers a free hot lunch, peer support, and other community resources as needed.   For more information: https://folktime.org/social-programs.

  1. NE Portland: Free To Be Me: The NE Portland Program is our flagship program operating at the Community of Christ Church. This program opened in 1986 offering a place for fellowship. This program is currently funded solely on fundraising efforts and is currently offering a free hot lunch, social activities, art, games, social and support groups. This program is open M, W, TH, F
  2. Social Program Oregon City: OC Social is open on site in downtown OC on Mon, Tues, Thurs and we meet in the community on Weds and Fri. We provide a full calendar of activities unique to that program and its members. Some of the things to do are visit with Ransom the Therapy Dog, writing group, OC Rock Club, bingo and make some dreamcatchers, puppets, or jewelry!
  3. Rural Outreach: Sandy/Molalla: The Rural Outreach Programs meets regularly at Ant Farm Community Cafe in Sandy and at the adult center in Molalla.  These programs act as a ‘pop up shop” type of social support program. We are aimed at dotting ourselves throughout Clackamas County in order to reach even the most rural corners.

 iii.      Clackamas County Department of Social Services (Non-Behavioral Health)

  1. Warming Shelter- Providing emergency services as needed in 4 warming shelter locations in Clackamas Co. Warming shelters provide a safe and warm space for folks to get out of the cold during winters coldest nights. FolkTime will provide peers who will monitor the shelters during the hours of 7pm- 7am. This is a pilot project and hope to continue adding additional counties in the future in an effort to get our houseless peers paid to provide this support across the Metro area.
  2. c.        Training Center:  FolkTime offers a wide range of training and technical assistance to various organizations, leadership, for human service providers, clinical leadership and staff and much more.  Providing in-depth trauma informed and cultural competency curriculum, activities, workshops and events.

FolkTime was recently given the privilege of housing all Intentional Peer Support (IPS) trainings in Oregon and has since created a hub supporting the implementation of consistent, high quality training opportunities across the state. Intentional Peer Support (IPS) training certifies participants as an Oregon Health Authority Traditional Health Worker Peer Support Specialist (PSS) & as an ACCBO Certified Recovery Mentor (CRM). The training also offers 40 continuing education units (CEUs).  Intentional Peer Support is trained across the US and currently in seven countries.  To learn more about IPS in Oregon go to www.folktime.org/training

To learn more about Intentional Peer Support US National go to: www.intentionalpeersupport.org

Are you ready to WALK?

The WALK with Refugees and Immigrants starts at 11 am at Gateway Discovery Park

Welcome to Portland!

Picture of woman and child at the WALK for Immigrants and RefugeesOur population is shy of 600,000 and growing. We are one of the fastest growing cities in the US. We are also one of the top ten destination spots for Immigrants and Refugees from across the globe. Statistically speaking: Oregon resettles more than 15,000 international migrants, and 11,000 interstate migrants, per year (Migration Policy Institute. 2010-2011). Portland proper resettles about 100 refugees (international migrants fleeing persecution) per month with about 1100-1400 new arrivals annually. Almost half of each Portland public school classroom goes home to an ethnic minority family (PPS Oct 2012) and 1-in-5 Portlanders are foreign-born. To celebrate the diversity of Portland and our tradition of celebrating new beginnings, we are holding the second WALK for Refugees and Immigrants! 

People are drawn to Portland for the same reasons they have always been from the very beginning: for the chance of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. It also helps that moving to Portland means access to beautiful green spaces, a car-free or car-light lifestyle, and an introduction to tons of wonderful welcoming people – like YOU! Come out and celebrate our New Portlanders.

This year, we will start the walk at the newly opened Gateway Discovery Park that will open on August 4th. We will gather with Community Leaders, Elected Leaders and community members to participate in a one-mile walk to support refugees and immigrants.

We will also hold a school supply drive! If you would like to contribute, please mail or drop of new or lightly used school supplies to: East Portland Community Center at 740 SE 106th Ave, Portland, OR 97216 – Atten: Som Subedi. We will be collecting supplies until August 31st, with distribution of most of those supplies at the event.

Map of the WALK for Immigrants and Refugee route for this yearCome join us in celebrating Portland and to welcome our New Portlanders!

August 19, 2018 (Sunday) 

  • The walk will start at 11 am from Gateway Discovery Park (10520 NE Halsey St, Portland, OR 97220)
  • Gathering and speakers start at 10:30 am at Gateway Discovery Park
  • At the end of the walk, enjoy diverse music, food and other family activities at Knott Park while also getting the chance to hear stories from Portland’s refugees and immigrants from 12 – 4 pm.  
  • See the full of the walking route here

We invite all neighbors, faith-based organizations, local businesses, board members, neighborhood associations, and non-profits to join us on this walk to inspire and continue a compassionate, generous, and welcoming Portland! If interested, please contact Som Subedi at 503-260-2487.

The Immigrant Story

The Immigrant Story is back to share stories about New Portlanders. Make sure to stop by their booth located at Knott Park!

Love social media?

Tweet and posts with us using the hashtags #PDXWelcomesAll   #WelcomeImmigrantFamilies.